[Read] ➱ Ashes to Ashes: America's Hundred-Year Cigarette War, the Public Health, and the Unabashed Trium ph of Philip Morris Author Richard Kluger – Dailytradenews.co.uk

Ashes to Ashes: America's Hundred-Year Cigarette War, the Public Health, and the Unabashed Trium ph of Philip Morris summary Ashes to Ashes: America's Hundred-Year Cigarette War, the Public Health, and the Unabashed Trium ph of Philip Morris, series Ashes to Ashes: America's Hundred-Year Cigarette War, the Public Health, and the Unabashed Trium ph of Philip Morris, book Ashes to Ashes: America's Hundred-Year Cigarette War, the Public Health, and the Unabashed Trium ph of Philip Morris, pdf Ashes to Ashes: America's Hundred-Year Cigarette War, the Public Health, and the Unabashed Trium ph of Philip Morris, Ashes to Ashes: America's Hundred-Year Cigarette War, the Public Health, and the Unabashed Trium ph of Philip Morris 833062c56d Ashes To Ashes Is A Monumental History Of The American Tobacco Industry S Ironic Success In Developing The Cigarette, Modern Society S Most Widespread Instrument Of Self Destruction, Into The Nation S Most Profitable Consumer Product Starting With Its Energized, Work Obsessed Royal Families, The Dukes And The Reynoldses, And Their Embattled Successors Like The Eccentric Autocrat George Washington Hill And The Feisty Joseph F Cullman, The Book Vividly Portrays The Cigarrettemakers Generations Of Entrepreneurial Geniuses Their Problematic Achievement Was Based On Cunning Business Strategies And Marketing Dazzle, Deft Political Power Plays, And A Relentless, Often Devious Attack On Antismoking Forces In Science, Public Health, And Government Enabling The Whole Process To Unfold Was The Weirdly Symbiotic Relationship Of An Industry Geared At Any Cost To Sell, Sell, Sell Cigarettes, And An American Public Habituated To Ignore All Health Warnings And Buy, Buy, BuyAt The Center Of This Epic Is The Continuing Drama Of The Philip Morris Company And The Crafty Men At Its Helm The Youngest, Once Smallest Entry In The Business, It Remained An Underdog Until The Marketing Brainstorm That Transformed The Marlboro Brand From Little Than A Woman S Fashion Accessory To The Ultimate Emblem Of Hairy Chested Machismo And Made It America S And The World S Smoke Remarkably, The Company S Global Prosperity Mounted Steadily Even As The News About Cigarettes And Health Grew Dire By The YearCaught Up In The Philip Morris Story Is The Whole Sweep Of America S Cigarette History, From The Glory Days Of Rampant Hucksterism When Smokers Would Walk A Mile For A Camel, Winston Tasted Good Like A Cigarette Should, And Most Of The Nation Could Decipher LS MFT To The Bombshell Surgeon General S Report That Definitively Indicted Smoking As A Killer, To The Age Of The Massive Mergers That Spawned RJR Nabisco And Philip Morris Kraft General FoodsHere We Learn How The Leaf That Was The New World S Most Passionately Devoured Gift To The Old Grew Into Humankind S Most Dangerous Consumer Product, Employing A Vast Rural Corps Of Laborers, Fattening Tax Revenues, And Propagating A Ring Of Fiercely Competitive Corporate Superpowers How Tobacco S Peerless Public Relations Spinners Applied Their Techniques To Becloud The Overwhelming Evidence Of The Cigarette S Lethal And Addictive Nature And Finally, How The Besieged Industry And The Aroused Public Health Forces Nationwide Collided Over Whether To Outlaw The Butt Habit Altogether Or Bring It Into Ever Withering Social Disdain And Under Ever Tighter Government Control


10 thoughts on “Ashes to Ashes: America's Hundred-Year Cigarette War, the Public Health, and the Unabashed Trium ph of Philip Morris

  1. says:

    This book is a beast At over 700 pages and dense as hell, it s not a quick read, but it stands as a highly revealing history of an industry that was once economically unstoppable, politically powerful, and undeniably harmful.The book follows two main strands of inquiry over the course of a century First, the importance of marketing in making and breaking the fortunes of the major industry players like Phillip Morris and RJ Reynolds The detail here is truly exhaustive and I admit that some of the twists and turns of market analysis could have been condensed Second, the slow but undeniable accumulation of scientific evidence linking cigarettes to lung cancer and other diseases The two threads are brought together once the scientific consensus sparks a political and legal struggle to rein in tobacco s influence and protect the public health.The larger political question lurking here is also fascinating what should we do about large, powerful corporations that harm the public welfare It s not an original observation to draw parallels between cigarettes and climate change, but with each chapter I was struck by just how similar the two issues, almost on a micro level For anyone who has followed currents of climate change denial over the past few decades, the bullshit is all found here too the bad faith and outright lies, the doctored studies, cautious in house lawyers and slick PR messaging Similar too are some of the authentically tricky public policy questions about individual choice versus public goods, about how political power flows from economic might, and how the complex interactions of presidents, congress, courts, citizens and activists eventually create social change.


  2. says:

    Phew It took some getting though but I finally managed to finish the book This book is definitely not a page turner, but to be fair to the author, the subject does not lend itself to being a page turner Having said that, I have read other books on similar topics that are far captivating Moving on the content, this is probably as comprehensive a book on the tobacco industry as a lay person might want The book has three broad themes one of the evolution of the industry from chew tobacco to cigars and the explosive growth after cigarettes were introduced, the other around the competition between the various tobacco companies and their struggle for market share and ebb and tide of success and failure that each went through, and finally about the anti smoking cause and the usual collusion between special interests and politics that allowed an industry that is very obviously bad for human health to stay outside of most regulatory oversight.Good coverage of the subject but pick it up only if you are game for a tough slog


  3. says:

    For the most part, a fascinating history of tobacco and tobacco companies that answers many questions you may have had about cigarette branding advertising Just who was Philip Morris anyway Later, it becomes a polemic as the author gleefully chronicles the lawsuit era.


  4. says:

    The author takes you to the depths of the smoking industry and their relentless effort to increase their profits and disclaim all the health and moral hazards of smoking At over 700 pages and dense as hell, it s not a quick read, but it stands as a highly revealing history of an industry that was once economically unstoppable, politically powerful, and undeniably harmful.


  5. says:

    Very detailed history of the smoking industry The author takes you to the depths of the smoking industry and their relentless effort to increase their profits and disclaim all the health and moral hazards of smoking.


  6. says:

    If you re still na ve enough to believe the government and big business have your personal interest at heart, read this book.


  7. says:

    I feel like I ve been reading this book all year An incredibly dense history, focused on the 1960s and onwards, about the cigarette industry Not a fan of smoking in the first place, this book revealed the lengths to which cigarette manufacturers went to to market their wares at each turn of public sentiment and scientific publication You almost stand in awe of their twisty turny logic and also a lot of disgust It also opened my eyes to all the different industries these behemoth companies were tapped into Miller Lite, Kraft Mac and Cheese, and Marlboros from the same company While interesting in content, it was a SLOW read, and at times a little dry.


  8. says:

    This books outlines the rise of the tobacco industry in America, focussing primarily on the health concerns that arose primarily after WWII, reaching its peak only in the 80 90s The book puts forth a case that the industry did know about the potential health concerns through its own research, but chose to consistently discontinue suppress research which could conclusively prove causality between smoking and lung cancer heart disease the book also highlights the current concerns with Environmental Tobacco Smoke ETS , better known as second hand smoke, and how research does not find it as dangerous as portrayed The book also outlines the rise and fall of the tobacco giants, and how they sought to diversify their business.From a strictly clinical point of view, the tobacco body corporates did what would have been expected of any entity defend the product from which they had made their billions Inconvertible proof was going to be a long time coming, and to give up a fortune because of a growing lobby would have been idealistic Further, the tobacco barons actually worked the American political system to their advantage, establishing a strong lobby group that has held off a fragmented anti smoking movement for decades All in all, a nice overview of the tobacco industry and the challenges it faces It s informative, but dry for the most part The long history also means there are many personalities and phases , which can be a challenge if you read this in intermittent spurts like I did.


  9. says:

    Fascinating and easy read about the history of the cigarette in the world and especially in the US Some interesting information FDA rules not applied to cigarettes as they were not a food or a beverage even though they contain lots of additives new type of tobacco leaf cured using charcoal, much deadlier because it could be inhaled into the lungs Called bright leaf tobacco Buck Duke after whom Duke U is named started a huge monopoly, which was disassembled by the Sherman anti trust legislation under Teddy Roosevelt Administration RJ Reynolds was part of the bigger trust, but when it was disbanded, he was able to pursue Camel At first, cigars and snuff were popular but with advent of WWI, impossible to smoke quickly in trenches, so cigarettes became popular Also felt that they calmed a person down even though they raise heart rate and bp p 4 growing plants is very time consuming and expensive one of the hardest plants to grow seedlings incubate for several months until read 5 8 , then transplanted one at a time, 6,000 10,0000 per acre Planted in little mounds to allow for drainage Intensive, stopping, painstaking labor Then, drying process Finally, gave up reading this book as I wasn t as engaged after I got the gist of what the author was saying Glad I read part of it, but couldn t make it through the whole thing.


  10. says:

    I wish I could have finished this book It was just so dry and way too in depth I picked this up wanting to get a better understanding of just how shady the tobacco industry is I didn t need it to explain how the body metabolizes nicotine or the myriad of other chemical reactions that takes place and while an overview of the history of is to be expected I didn t really need to know it s history in detail from the time of the fricken bronze age By the time I got to the meat and potatoes of the industries dastardly deeds I was so sick of reading this book I simply couldn t go on I appreciate the immense research the author clearly did to paint the full picture but for me it was overkill.Also the text was so small it was the size of the text used to write poems on grains of rice I felt overwhelmed just looking at the font.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *